COVID Hubris, Collapse, and Resilience: Pandemic in the New World (Part 4)

In the year 1500, Europe was experiencing the Renaissance and the explosion of thought that followed the invention of the printing press. The Aztecs and Incas dominated large empires in the New World. When London and Rome’s populations numbered around 50,000 each, Tenochtitlan, the Aztec capital, was home to about 200,000. Cusco, the Inca capital, was only the size of London or Rome, but controlled an empire linked by 40,000 km (25,000 mi.) of roads. By 1533, both Tenochtitlan and Cusco were in Spanish hands. … More COVID Hubris, Collapse, and Resilience: Pandemic in the New World (Part 4)

COVID-19 Disruption is Just a Foreshadowing of Later Problems

Correlation does not equal causation. In this case, COVID-19 has reduced our travel and use of fossil fuels for transport by 31 percent overall (source in graphic). Although we are not seeing a decline in the use of fossil fuels leading to reduced transportation (rather the reverse), it can be considered a small-scale dry run … More COVID-19 Disruption is Just a Foreshadowing of Later Problems

Low-Tech Recession?

The news is full of talk of recession. The dreaded inverted yield curve (short-term bonds have higher yields than long-term ones — the inverse of the typical state) has occurred less than two years before every recession since 1955 (and the one time it happened without a recession following was the economic slowdown of the … More Low-Tech Recession?

Moshav: A Cooperative Agricultural Community

Most English speakers know the terms kibbutz (Israeli communal agricultural communities) and commune (now called intentional communities) as groups of people living together and sharing their property, work, land, and buildings to greater or lessor extents. One reason that I think these communities didn’t catch on in the US is the strong ethos of individual … More Moshav: A Cooperative Agricultural Community