Proposal: Companion Planting (Intercropping) Corn, Beans, and Squash in Wisconsin Market Farms

While monocrops are considered the norm for small- and large-scale modern farming, intercropping, or the planting of more than one crop in a single field (also called polycropping or polyculture), has been used in the Americas and around the world since the beginning of agriculture. In this study, we will examine the effects of intercropping … More Proposal: Companion Planting (Intercropping) Corn, Beans, and Squash in Wisconsin Market Farms

Potatoes Five Ways: A Trial Looking at Different Potato-Growing Methods

Potatoes are an underappreciated garden crop. People can survive on this tuber alone because it contains everything for complete nutrition. Spuds thrive in diverse soils and climates. They store well and are easy to plant and care for. Because potatoes are cheap in the grocery store, many gardeners opt not to cultivate them, but for … More Potatoes Five Ways: A Trial Looking at Different Potato-Growing Methods

Proposal for Community Sheep Flock Co-op to Maintain Village Commons and Oak Grove

UPDATE, 22 October 2018: After talking with neighbors and the community, we have updated our plan to include an area of mowed grass near the community center. This reduces the overall grazing area to 2.5 acres of grass and 3 acres of forest, meaning our maximum herd size is nineteen, but a dozen or so … More Proposal for Community Sheep Flock Co-op to Maintain Village Commons and Oak Grove

Field Day: Varroa-Tolerant Bee Breeding Program, Sept. 22, 3–5 p.m., Free

The Low Technology Institute is running a breeding program to establish varroa-tolerant colonies in a semi-isolated area. The essence of the process is to split hives aggressively to have as many reasonably strong colonies as possible going into winter and then heavily splitting those that survive. Without treatment, colonies with poor tolerance will succumb to … More Field Day: Varroa-Tolerant Bee Breeding Program, Sept. 22, 3–5 p.m., Free

Bee Report — “Cutout” becomes a “Trapout” in Brodhead

A healthy bee colony will outgrow its hive most years. When this happens, a swarm is sent out, dividing the colony into two or more: the original queen leaves with half the hive and those left behind raise new queens from left-over eggs. The swarm parks itself in a convenient location as a large mass … More Bee Report — “Cutout” becomes a “Trapout” in Brodhead