Tom Eggert Talk on Local Micro Investing in Sustainable Endeavors, Feb. 28

Whether or not you are ambivalent about industrial capitalism, we can agree that keeping our resources local is a positive thing. Tom Eggert —  Senior Lecturer in Business Sustainability at the Nelson Institute — will be presenting options and strategies for regular people to invest in local startups and other avenues in a talk he’ll … More Tom Eggert Talk on Local Micro Investing in Sustainable Endeavors, Feb. 28

Visit our Libraries, Both Tool and Book Varieties!

Friend of the institute, Lynn L., recently donated two decades–worth of Small Farmer’s Journal to our lending library. Thanks to Lynn for her generosity and thanks also for reminding me to promote these community resources! Resource Library Our resource library can be accessed from any page on our website by going to the “Libraries” in … More Visit our Libraries, Both Tool and Book Varieties!

Small-Scale Hydropower?

Hydropower has a mixed environmental record. Large projects like dams that impound entire rivers are coming down across the west, as their impact on fish hatcheries and other ecosystems is now better understood. Furthermore, in addition to carbon-free power, one of the benefits was supposed to be flood control, but we are now seeing that … More Small-Scale Hydropower?

The Village of Cooksville: “A Little Slice of New England” — Wisconsin Life

The Low Technology Institute is located in the historic village of Cooksville, Wisconsin. Our village was recently the topic of the Wisconsin Life radio series on our local NPR station. You can read the article, by Norman Gilliland, on the website, or click the link below to hear the produced audio segment. https://wpr-podcast.streamguys1.com/wlf/wlf180207_Cooksville_Glliland.mp3 The Low-Tech … More The Village of Cooksville: “A Little Slice of New England” — Wisconsin Life

Link Worth Following — The Freakonomics of Lawns

The radio show Freakonomics recently spent a half hour discussing the pros and cons of lawns. They delve into the history of this now-too-common landscaping trend. I particularly liked that they pointed out the lack of natural parallel for lawns: the only thing that looks remotely like a lawn is a pasture after sheep have … More Link Worth Following — The Freakonomics of Lawns